Landscape Services

Landscape Services

Tree Management

Introduction

Clemson University is committed to providing a safe, attractive, educational and sustainable campus urban forest through preservation of existing trees and new tree plantings. A tree may be considered for removal for any of the following reasons: it is determined to be dead or diseased beyond preservation; its location, condition, or deterioration constitutes a safety hazard; its location affects the preservation and maintenance of adjacent buildings; the tree is damaged from the elements or disease to the extent that its appearance is unduly affected; its location is determined to be an obstruction or hazard to utility lines; its location interferes with the construction of facilities and associated site development; or for other appropriate reasons. The determination of trees meeting the above conditions is the responsibility of the Director of Landscape Services in consultation with the University Arborist and independent arbor consultants.

Upcoming Replantings

Locations for upcoming tree plantings are being determined.

Project Removals

Trees recently approved for removal are listed below.

Trees adjacent to construction areas will be protected as prescribed within.

Electrical Distribution System Upgrades and Replacements

Duke Energy CHP Facility

In preparation of the Duke Energy Combined Heat and Power Plant (CHP) facility, several trees will need to be removed from the R-1 parking area to facilitate site grading and utility construction for this facility. Construction and tree removals are expected to begin mid-May 2018. Tree removal and construction will be performed by Duke Energy Contractor, Crowder Industrial Construction.

Phase One Upgrades

In preparation of the first phase of the campus Electrical Distribution System Upgrades and Replacement Project, several trees will need to be removed that are in the path of the work that will be taking place along Walter T. Cox Boulevard near Sikes Hall and the sidewalk which runs from Sikes Hall to Long Hall. In addition, a grove of pine trees adjacent to the western side of the West Energy Facility will need to be removed in order to facilitate the construction of the new West Campus Switching Station (WCSS). All of these trees will be removed by Bartlett Tree Experts in December 2017.

Phase Two Upgrades

In preparation of the second phase of work associated with the University electrical upgrade project, a white oak and a willow oak are scheduled for early removal over Christmas break 2018. The trees will be removed by the University Landscape Services Department.

Other Removals

Landscaping Services performs a yearly risk management inspection of all inventoried campus trees. Upon the completion of this year’s inspection, our Consulting Arborist recommended the following trees for removal. These trees pose a significant risk of failure and have the potential to cause personal injury or property damage.

1 - Tree 010261

Click to enlarge aerial view. The numbers correspond with the trees listed on this page.

This tree is a 22-inh dbh green ash on the west side of the outdoor amphitheatre. The trunk has an open cavity on the east side about 15 feet above ground, and a large limb broke out of the tree recently as well. In addition, the crown is thin and exhibiting considerable small twig dieback. Although the current risk is low, there is a possible danger to nearby pedestrians. With the tree in obvious decline, the tree will be removed within the next six to nine months.

2 - Tree 010512

This tree is a 43-inch dbh white oak at the intersection of Williamson Road and Highway 93. A Ganoderma fruiting body, first observed in September 2012, triggered Resistograph probes in March 2013 around the trunk at ground level by campus staff. Some internal decay was confirmed, but the degree of trunk strength loss associated with the decay was well within industry tolerances. Presently, the crown is very thin with small branch dieback throughout, indicating root decay. The basal roots are also decayed at this point. Currently posing a moderate risk to pedestrians and vehicles, the tree will be removed within the next three to six months.

3 - Tree 020107

This tree is a 40-inh dbh white oak in the pecan grove near the stone gate. The tree has a basal wound with some decay and fluxing at several points along the lower trunk. Root decay is also probable, since the crown now has significant dieback, which was not present 30 months ago. In its current state, the tree poses a moderate risk to pedestrians and will be removed within the next three to six months.

4 - Tree 020451

This tree is a 48-inch dbh white oak along Parkway Drive north of Smith Hall. Several buttress roots have visible decay; unfortunately, the extent of decay below ground cannot be determined. Posing a moderate threat to pedestrians and vehicles, particularly with its proximity to Parkway Drive, the tree will be removed within the next three to six months.

5 - Tree 020775

This tree is a 42-inch dbh water oak in President’s Park south. This tree is only in fair condition and has an Inonotus dryadeus fruiting body at the base, indicating internal root and lower trunk decay. It will certainly continue to decline with the root and butt decay, so retaining the tree is not prudent. It will be removed within the next six to nine months.

6 - Tree 050303

From Wikipedia: The lingzhi mushroom is a polypore mushroom belonging to the genus Ganoderma. Its red-varnished, kidney-shaped cap gives it a distinct appearance.

This tree is a 43-inch dbh white oak at the edge of the Lehotsky Hall parking lot. This tree has had Ganoderma lucidum fruiting bodies on the lower trunk since 2012. Initially, the internal decay appeared to be limited in extent. However, during this inspection, the trunk has a general hollow sound when struck with a mallet, indicating that the decay has spread. The trunk also has slime flux at the base. Although the risk of tree failure is not high, the tree is obviously declining and will not recover or improve. To ensure the safety of pedestrians and vehicles, the tree will be removed within the next twelve months.

7 - Tree 070363

This tree is a 37-inch dbh white oak near the small parking lot on the east side of Williamson Road. The root collar has a basal cavity on the parking lot side of the tree that extends about one foot inward. Further, the tree resides on a mound of soil, which suggests the root system may have been compromised by past construction activities. The level of risk to pedestrians and vehicles is enough to justify removing the tree, which will occur within the next six to nine months.

8 - Tree 070547

This tree is a 22-inch dbh eastern red cedar adjacent to a sidewalk near Hunter Hall. Much of the trunk is hollow and the tree is in poor health with a live crown ratio of 5 percent or less. While the risk of tree failure is low, it still poses some risk to passerbys. It will be removed within the next twelve months.

9 - Tree 070592

This tree is a 32-inch black maple at the intersection of Perimeter Road and Lambda St. The trunk is hollow with an open cavity extending east to west throughout. The level of risk to pedestrians and vehicles is enough to justify removing the tree. This will occur within the next six to nine months.

10 - Tree 090026

This tree is a 32-inch loblolly pine near the parking lot across from Ground Service Drive. The trunk has a large fusiform canker on the east side. Further, vehicles routinely park under the tree, compacting the soil and contributing to its decline. Given this, the tree will be removed within the next six to nine months.

11 - Tree 340281

This tree is an 18-inch red maple near building 308. The tree has extensive lower trunk decay on the street side and will be removed.