Landscape Services

Landscape Services

Tree Management

Clemson University is committed to providing a safe, attractive, educational and sustainable campus urban forest through preservation of existing trees and new tree plantings. A tree may be considered for removal for any of the following reasons: it is determined to be dead or diseased beyond preservation; its location, condition, or deterioration constitutes a safety hazard; its location affects the preservation and maintenance of adjacent buildings; the tree is damaged from the elements or disease to the extent that its appearance is unduly affected; its location is determined to be an obstruction or hazard to utility lines; its location interferes with the construction of facilities and associated site development; or for other appropriate reasons. The determination of trees meeting the above conditions is the responsibility of the Director of Landscape Services in consultation with the University Arborist and independent arbor consultants.

Replantings

While the University removes trees when necessary, it also acts on any opportunity to replant trees as well. Below is a list of upcoming replantings.

President's Park Tree Plantings

Seven Tulip Poplars and six Live Oaks were planted along Highway 93 and Parkway Drive.

Other Replantings

Removals

Trees recently approved for removal are listed below.

Trees adjacent to construction areas will be protected as prescribed within.

Highway 76 Parking Area Expansion

Numerous trees will need to be removed for implementation of the Highway 76 Parking Area Expansion Project. Trees adjacent to the construction area will be protected as prescribed by the University Arborist. Trees will be replaced based on a new design by Land Planning Associates in consultation with Barrett Anderson, Campus Landscape Architect.

Electrical Distribution System Upgrades and Replacements

In preparation of the first phase of the campus Electrical Distribution System Upgrades and Replacement Project, several trees will need to be removed that are in the path of the work that will be taking place along Walter T. Cox Boulevard near Sikes Hall and the sidewalk which runs from Sikes Hall to Long Hall. In addition, a grove of pine trees adjacent to the western side of the West Energy Facility will need to be removed in order to facilitate the construction of the new West Campus Switching Station (WCSS). All of these trees will be removed by Bartlett Tree Experts in December 2017.

Tennis Center Construction

A new state-of-the-art tennis center will be constructed for the Men’s and Women’s varsity tennis teams. The new center will retain and continue to utilize the six existing outdoor competition courts and the 700-seat permanent stadium. The new center will include six indoor competition courts, a clubhouse containing locker rooms, a training room, equipment rooms, players’ lounges, laundry and coaches offices, six new outdoor courts and related sitework. The new facility will enhance recruiting efforts, improve student ahtlete playing experiences, improve opportunities for NCAA regionals and other championships to be hosted here.

As the footprint of the new center will maximize the exisitng site area, several trees will need to be harvested as a result. Many of these trees have been requested to be removed by the campus arborist as they are either not good specimens, are of failing health or will suffer damage as a result of the construction process. New trees will be planted to replace trees removed from the site and will be identified in a future landscape plan.

College of Business

Plans are progressing for Clemson University’s new College of Business building, with preparation for the ceremonial groundbreaking Oct. 27 and start of construction scheduled for December. This planned state-of-the-art facility, with views of Bowman Field and main campus, will sit on the hill across from Sikes Hall and serve as an academic anchor for the Douthit Hills residential area.

In the weeks leading up to the groundbreaking, several trees on the site will be harvested to make way for utility work. The university has enlisted professionals to carefully remove these trees and prepare the wood for use in furniture and other items in the new business building or other facilities on campus.

Clemson University students from forestry and other disciplines will benefit from the process as they see and learn firsthand how an urban forest can be put to good use as buildings are constructed in urban settings.

New trees will be planted to replace trees removed from the site. The foliage will add shade and beauty to outdoor gathering spaces around the new building. One of the concept precedents for the new College of Business is the Spanish Steps in Rome, Italy -- a dynamic pedestrian space that engages many of the surrounding areas and amenities.

Other Removals

Tree 020221 is a 50-inch over mature post oak located east of Edwards’s Hall. This tree is suffering from root decay that has advanced since 2015. This tree continues to exhibit large dead wood after crown cleanings suggesting further decline in the root system. Removal is recommended for this tree based on the history of failure with post oaks on campus and the difficulty predicting those failures with advanced risk assessment procedures. Bartlett tree experts has done the assessments on this tree.

Tree 030411 is a 40-inch over mature post oak located north/west of the alumni center. This tree exhibits almost the same concerns as tree 020221. This tree is suffering from root decay that has advanced since 2015. This tree continues to exhibit large dead wood after crown cleanings suggesting further decline in the root system. Removal is recommended for this tree based on the history of failure with post oaks on campus and the difficulty predicting those failures with advanced risk assessment procedures. Bartlett tree experts has done the assessments on this tree.

Tree 050268 is a 40-inch white oak located in the McGinty Mall area. This tree is in decline and continues to shed large dead wood. There is also extensive lower basil trunk decay on the north side of the tree that is more than likely contributing to its decline. Tree removal is now recommended for this tree.

Tree 010309 is a 26-inch southern magnolia behind Tillman Hall. This tree has extensive decay and poses an unreasonable risk. This tree will be removed.